Made the Local News!

Stranger rallies support for baby boy in coma

By Emily Weaver
Times-News Staff Writer
Published: Wednesday, August 7, 2013 at 4:30 a.m.
Last Modified: Tuesday, August 6, 2013 at 9:32 p.m.

A mother of four in Arden is rallying prayer and community support for a baby boy who remains in a “persistent coma” at Mission Hospital. The man accused of putting him in the hospital remains in jail.

Justin Andrew Pate, 23, of Old White St. in Mountain Home has been charged with felony child abuse after a 5-month-old in his care was found unresponsive at a home on Dorado Lane July 10. The infant, Clay, was “in full cardiac arrest” when rescue personnel arrived. Clay remains in critical condition.

When Willow Arnold first saw the story, she felt compelled to help.

“I was really, deeply crushed,” she said. “You hear tragic things on the news all the time, but for some reason this was a story that God placed in my heart that made me reach out. I kept thinking, ‘is he OK? Is he OK?’”

Arnold, who is a mother to four children ranging in age from 1 to 7, felt her heart break for a family she had never met. Now she has become one of the family’s staunchest allies and its unofficial spokesperson, keeping a caring community up-to-date about Clay’s fight for survival.

“I just want to get people involved and aware and praying for this baby,” she said Tuesday. “The family and I believe in the power of prayer.”

Clay has beaten the odds so far, surviving when medical professionals have doubted his prognosis, but if he recovers, he has a long road ahead of him.

Arnold said Clay has been taken off of a ventilator and is now breathing on his own, but he remains in a “persistent coma.” Wrapped in a blanket, with socks over his feet and hands and a cap on his head to keep him warm, Clay has not been able to regulate his own body temperature.

“We don’t know what’s going to happen, but we’re praying for a miracle,” she said. “That’s all we can do.”

Investigators say that on July 10, Clay’s mother left him with her fiancé while she went to work. She never saw this coming, Arnold said.

“That particular day was tragic for Clay and his mother. Her life will never be the same and neither will that baby’s,” she said. “It’s just sad. I just can’t imagine what she’s going through… to see her baby in that state. She hasn’t left the baby’s side.”

Arnold said doctors have done just about all they can do and may soon send the baby home with caregivers, where he will remain in a coma until he wakes up or “the unthinkable happens” and he never wakes up.

Call to act

After the story was first reported, Arnold waited for updates on the baby’s condition, but nothing followed.

“For a period of about a week or two it just drove me crazy,” she said. “I decided to reach out to the family through the hospital.”

Arnold, who quilts lightweight blankets from home to create an extra income for her family, took a blanket to the hospital for baby Clay. The staff cited privacy laws and she was turned away with her gift, but she asked the nurses to let the family know that somebody cared and was praying for them.

A couple of days went by without a word. Arnold said she continued to pray and then decided to rally more prayers through Facebook. She created the page, “Prayers for Hendersonville Baby Boy,” on July 22 and built a few ads to promote the site.

Within 24 hours, nearly 200 people had liked the page. As of 6 p.m. Tuesday it had 589 followers. She said she was expecting 600 by the end of the week.

After the site was launched, Arnold said the family contacted her and she met with them two days later to give them the blanket.

With the family’s permission, she has posted photos of Clay and several updates about his condition on the site.

Arnold organized a prayer vigil, which was held at her church, The River Church in Asheville, on July 25. More than a dozen people signed up to attend. A nationwide prayer chain, she said, now reaches all the way to missionaries in Zimbabwe.

Becoming an advocate

“One baby every day dies from Shaken Baby Syndrome and thousands more are hospitalized,” Arnold said. She has researched the syndrome extensively since learning about Clay.

“The whole thing is heartbreaking, it really is,” she said. “I plan to keep pushing for advocacy in this area… I don’t think enough is being done.”

She added that there are hotlines parents can call if they get stressed out and don’t know how to quiet a baby who continues to cry. For a condition that robs so many infants of vibrant, healthy lives, she said, the syndrome can be “extremely preventable.”

With the support of sponsors, Arnold is hoping to have a float to honor Clay in the upcoming Apple Festival parade. She is seeking volunteers to help hand out fliers during the procession.

To volunteer, to help in the parade or to sponsor a float or fliers, contact Arnold through the Facebook page “Prayers for Hendersonville Baby Boy” or email Willow_arnold@aol.com.

Reach Weaver at emily.weaver@blueridgenow.com or 828-694-7867……………………………..

READ MORE HERE….

http://www.blueridgenow.com/article/20130807/ARTICLES/130809890

Watch the NEWS 13 WLOS video….

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Thinking about a Home Birth?

What happens during a planned home birth?

During a planned home birth you’ll give birth in your home instead of in a hospital or birth center. You’ll be assisted during labor and delivery by a midwife or, in some cases, a doctor. During your prenatal care your health care provider will review a list of conditions during pregnancy and labor that would require treatment by a doctor and compromise the safety of a planned home birth. Your health care provider will also review the challenges that can occur during childbirth, how he or she — in comparison with a hospital — would handle them, and the possible health risks for you and your baby.

During labor, your health care provider will periodically —rather than continuously — monitor your temperature, pulse, blood pressure and your baby’s heart rate. After delivery, you’ll be close to your baby. Your health care provider will examine your newborn and determine whether he or she needs to be transferred to a hospital. In addition, your health care provider will give you information on how to care for your newborn. Follow-up care might include home visits and lactation support.

Why do women choose planned home births?

You might choose a planned home birth for many reasons, including:

  • A desire to give birth in a familiar, relaxing environment surrounded by people of your choice
  • A desire to wear your own clothes, take a shower or bath, eat, drink and move around freely during labor
  • A desire to control your labor position and/or other aspects of the birthing process
  • A desire to give birth without medical intervention such as pain medication
  • Cultural or religious norms or concerns
  • A history of fast labor
  • Lower cost

You can prepare for a planned home birth by:

  • Choosing a trained health care provider to assist. Choose a certified nurse-midwife, a certified midwife or a doctor who has a formal relationship with a health care system overseen by your state health department or the Joint Commission. Make sure he or she has easy access to consultation with doctors or specialists at a collaborating hospital, if necessary. If you’re interested in additional physical and emotional support, consider hiring a doula — a professional labor assistant.
  • Creating a birth plan. Where do you plan to experience labor and delivery? Will you use any specific methods, such as Lamaze, to cope with pain? Do you plan to have a water birth? Will you breast-feed your baby immediately after delivery? What other family members or support people will be present? Be sure to discuss the details of your birthing plan with your health care provider. Ask your health care provider what kind of supplies you’ll need to provide, such as towels, sheets or other protective coverings for your floor or mattress.
  • Preparing for a hospital transfer. Discuss with your health care provider the signs and symptoms that might necessitate going to a hospital and how a hospital transfer will affect your birthing plan. Ideally, your home or other planned birth location is within 15 minutes of a hospital with 24-hour maternity care. Make sure you have access to transportation. Ask your health care provider to make arrangements with a nearby hospital to ensure that you can be promptly transferred and treated, if necessary.
  • Choosing a pediatrician. Plan a medical exam for your baby within a few days of birth.
  • Arranging for postpartum help. After delivery, you might need help caring for yourself and your new baby. Arrange for family or friends to help. A doula can also provide postpartum support.

What else do I need to know about a planned home birth?

With careful planning, a home birth can be a positive and rewarding experience. Keep in mind, however, that life-threatening problems can occur during labor and delivery without warning. In those cases, the need to transfer you and your baby to a hospital could delay care, which could put your lives at risk. Understanding the risks and benefits of a home birth can help you make an informed decision about how you plan to give birth.

Sources:
Mayo Clinic. Web

Placenta Encapsulation Tutorial

****WARNING GRAPHIC PICTURES****

I previously posted regarding the benefits of consuming your placenta post partum in detail with scientific evidence (see previous blog post for the long details & evidence)

The benefits of placenta encapsulation include:

  • Decrease in baby blues & PPD (Post Partum Depression).
  • Increasing and enriching breastmilk supply
  • Increase in energy (Yay!)
  • Decrease in lochia, postpartum bleeding (Very cool!)
  • Decrease iron deficiency or post partum anemia.
  • Decrease insomnia and sleep disorders.
  • Decreases postpartum “night sweats”.

        The placenta’s hormonal make-up is completely unique to the mother. No vitamin, supplement or pill can equal what the placenta can do. Isn’t that pretty cool? It has also been reported to being made into a tincture to be given to the baby that it once supported during infancy and childhood for a variety of benefits. 

*******WARNING GRAPHIC PICTURES***********

OK SO NOW I WILL SHOW YOU HOW TO ENCAPSULATE YOUR OWN…
PLACENTA ENCAPSULATION TUTORIAL
Supplies Needed:

Gloves
Steamer for stove top
Fresh ginger and lemon
Cutting Board
Capsules, 150-200
Dehydrator or Oven

Food Processor or Coffee Grinder or (mortar & pestal- if your a fabulous and strong eco warrior)
Sanitizer and bleachSTEP 1. Place placenta in strainer/colander in sink. Rinse under water removing blood clots.Preparing my placenta that supported my son 07/07/12 before processing My placenta that supported my son 07/07/12 ready for encapsulation

STEP 2. *Not for the squeemish* Place on cutting board and severe cord at base. It will likely bleed little bit. 

If you prefer to do the raw method you would thinly slice the placenta after you have cleaned it. Laying the slices on dehydrator trays(or in the oven), keeping the temp below 118F to preserve maximum nutrients and keep enzymes intact.

STEP 3. Begin steaming it on the stove, (I don’t find this an offensive smell, but it can be strong and distinct to some, this may be a good time to send guests and your hubby out for a while and open a window). Wrap placenta membrane fetal side around placenta into a ball. Place lemon & ginger in water in steamer. Put placenta in steam basket and cover. Steam on medium for about 15mins on *each side*. Bleed whiling steaming (stabbing/poking it). SKIP THIS STEP IF YOU ARE DOING THE RAW METHOD

2012-07-07_17.26.11-2

My Placenta After Steaming/Before Slicing

STEP 4. Slice up placenta into thin strips at this point. If you are using a low oven to dehydrate your placenta, set oven to lowest temp. It takes 12-24hrs to dehydrate depending on method used.  It’s best to slice thin and keep them uniform in thickness and length so they dehydrate evenly. 

STEP 5.  GRIND THE STRIPS.. Using a strong grinder or processor, grind placenta strips. They are going to be very hard. You want to grind them down to a fine powder. You may want to break the dehydrated strips in half prior to grinding, actually I recommend this so you don’t break your grinder/processor which I have heard can happen. This is the time to add/mix in any familiar and beneficial dried herbs if desired.

STEP 6.  Fill capsules. One placenta will yield *about 125-175 capsules*. You can use equipment like The Capsule Machine but I have done mine by hand and it wasn’t too bad. A good capsule size is “00”.There are smaller size capsules available. 

534709_3772762871143_2107766553_n
My Placenta After:        Encapsulated

STEP 7. Store capsules in refrigerator or freezer, they will keep indefinitely. How many to take depends on the mother and her needs. . Typically 1-3 caps 2-3 times a day.. Depending on the herbs you used, and the level of need this should be tailored. Generally most moms start of with the 1-3, 3  times a day- and then taper down after a week or two. If mom is feeling fatigued, low milk supply or emotionally fragile you can increase dosage or take anytime down the road for a pick-me-up. (THIS ISN’T MEDICAL ADVICE or Substitute for Medical care)

STEP 8.  Clean up & Sanitize everything

This post is not medical advice and is not a substitute for seeing your health care provider. 

The Natural Benefits of Placentophagy (Consuming your Placenta Post Partum)

The placenta is an amazing organ that after birth most mammals will eat it to complete the birth process instinctually. In many cultures and societies this is still a common normal practice. In the USA it is trending in more acceptance and awareness. There are a variety of ways that you can consume your placenta. Some midwives will encourage their mothers to take a raw bite at the birth to help ease the recovery immediately.

The more popular routes to consumption in modern cultures are to prepare recipes with the placenta or if that doesn’t sound very appetizing, you can always process the placenta and encapsulate it like a pill.

Why would anyone eat their placenta? Does this sound barbaric to you? Modern day cannabelism? Nah, it’s really natural. Think about it. Most mammals will consume the placenta after birth. Why wouldn’t humans? Take a moment to really be present with that…

The benefits of placenta encapsulation include:

  • Decrease in baby blues & PPD (Post Partum Depression).
  • Increasing and enriching breastmilk supply
  • Increase in energy (Yay!)
  • Decrease in lochia, postpartum bleeding (Very cool!)
  • Decrease iron deficiency or post partum anemia.
  • Decrease insomnia and sleep disorders.
  • Decreases postpartum “night sweats”.

        The placenta’s hormonal make-up is completely unique to the mother. No vitamin, supplement or pill can equal what the placenta can do. Isn’t that pretty cool? It has also been reported to being made into a tincture to be given to the baby that it once supported during infancy and childhood for a variety of benefits. 

Below is an article on the scientific benefits on consuming the placenta or also known as placentophagy from Placenta Benefits Ltd.. Futher information can be found on their website at http://placentabenefits.info/articles.asp 

“Scientific Evidence

Placenta as Lactagagon
Soykova-Pachnerova E, et. al.(1954). Gynaecologia 138(6):617-627.

An attempt was made to increase milk secretion in mothers by administration of dried placenta per os. Of 210 controlled cases only 29 (13.8%) gave negative results; 181 women (86.2%) reacted positively to the treatment, 117 (55.7%) with good and 64 (30.5%) with very good results. It could be shown by similar experiments with a beef preparation that the effective substance in placenta is not protein. Nor does the lyofilised placenta act as a biogenic stimulator so that the good results of placenta administration cannot be explained as a form of tissue therapy per os. The question of a hormonal influence remains open. So far it could be shown that progesterone is probably not active in increasing lactation after administration of dried placenta.

This method of treating hypogalactia seems worth noting since the placenta preparation is easily obtained, has not so far been utilized and in our experience is successful in the majority of women.

Placentophagia: A Biobehavioral Enigma
KRISTAL, M. B. NEUROSCI. BIOBEHAV. REV. 4(2) 141-150, 1980.

Although ingestion of the afterbirth during delivery is a reliable component of parturitional behavior of mothers in most mammalian species, we know almost nothing of the direct causes or consequences of the act. Traditional explanations of placentophagia, such as general or specific hunger, are discussed and evaluated in light of recent experimental results. Next, research is reviewed which has attempted to distinguish between placentophagia as a maternal behavior and placentophagia as an ingestive behavior. Finally, consequences of the behavior, which may also be viewed as ultimate causes in an evolutionary sense, are considered, such as the possibility of beneficial effects on maternal behavior or reproductive competence, on protection against predators, and on immunological protection afforded either the mother or the young.

Placenta for Pain Relief:
Placenta ingestion by rats enhances y- and n-opioid antinociception, but suppresses A-opioid antinociception
Jean M. DiPirro*, Mark B. Kristal

Ingestion of placenta or amniotic fluid produces a dramatic enhancement of centrally mediated opioid antinociception in the rat. The present experiments investigated the role of each opioid receptor type (A, y, n) in the antinociception-modulating effects of Placental Opioid-Enhancing Factor (POEF—presumably the active substance). Antinociception was measured on a 52 jC hotplate in adult, female rats after they ingested placenta or control substance (1.0 g) and after they received an intracerebroventricular injection of a y-specific ([D-Pen2,D-Pen5]enkephalin (DPDPE); 0, 30, 50, 62, or 70 nmol), A-specific ([D-Ala2,N-MePhe4,Gly5-ol]enkephalin (DAMGO); 0, 0.21, 0.29, or 0.39 nmol), or n-specific (U-62066; spiradoline; 0, 100, 150, or 200 nmol) opioid receptor agonist. The results showed that ingestion of placenta potentiated y- and n-opioid antinociception, but attenuated A-opioid antinociception. This finding of POEF action as both opioid receptor-specific and complex provides an important basis for understanding the intrinsic pain-suppression mechanisms that are activated during parturition and modified by placentophagia, and important information for the possible use of POEF as an adjunct to opioids in pain management.
D 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Effects of placentophagy on serum prolactin and progesterone concentrations in rats after parturition or superovulation.
Blank MS, Friesen HG.: J Reprod Fertil. 1980 Nov;60(2):273-8.

In rats that were allowed to eat the placentae after parturition concentrations of serum prolactin were elevated on Day 1 but concentrations of serum progesterone were depressed on Days 6 and 8 post partum when compared to those of rats prevented from eating the placentae. In rats treated with PMSG to induce superovulation serum prolactin and progesterone values were significantly (P < 0.05) elevated on Days 3 and 5 respectively, after being fed 2 g rat placenta/day for 2 days. However, feeding each rat 4 g placenta/day
significantly (P < 0.02) lowered serum progesterone on Day 5. Oestrogen injections or bovine or human placenta in the diet had no effect. The organic phase of a petroleum ether extract of rat placenta (2 g-equivalents/day) lowered peripheral concentrations of progesterone on Day 5, but other extracts were ineffective. We conclude that the rat placenta contains orally-active substance(s) which modify blood levels of pituitary and ovarian hormones.

Baby blues – postpartum depression attributed to low levels of corticotropin-releasing hormone after placenta is gone – Brief Article

Many new mothers feel depressed for weeks after giving birth. Physicians have vaguely attributed this malaise to exhaustion and to the demands of motherhood. But a group of researchers at the National Institutes of Health has found evidence for a more specific cause of postpartum blues. New mothers, the researchers say, have lower than normal levels of a stress-fighting hormone that earlier studies have found helps combat depression.
When we are under stress, a part of the brain called the hypothalamus secretes corticotropin-releasing hormone, or CRH. Its secretion triggers a cascade of hormones that ultimately increases the amount of another hormone – called cortisol – in the blood. Cortisol raises blood sugar levels and maintains normal blood pressure, which helps us perform well under stress. Normally the amount of cortisol in the bloodstream is directly related to the amount of CRH released from the hypothalamus. That’s not the case in pregnant women.
During the last trimester of pregnancy, the placenta secretes a lot of CRH. The rise is so dramatic that CRH levels in the maternal bloodstream increase threefold. “We can only speculate,” says George Chrousos, the endocrinologist who led the NIH study, “but we think it helps women go through the stress of pregnancy, labor, and delivery.”
But what happens after birth, when the placenta is gone? Chrousos and his colleagues monitored CRH levels in 17, women from the last trimester to a year after they gave birth. All the women had low levels of CRH – as low as seen in some forms of depression – in the six weeks following birth. The seven women with the lowest levels felt depressed.
Chrousos suspects that CRH levels are temporarily low in new mothers because CRH from the placenta disrupts the feedback system that regulates normal production of the hormone. During pregnancy, when CRH levels are high in the bloodstream, the hypothalamus releases less CRH. After birth, however, when this supplementary source of CRH is gone, it takes a while for the hypothalamus to get the signal that it needs to start making more CRH.
“This finding gives reassurance to people that postpartum depression is a transient phenomenon,” says Chrousos. “It also suggests that there is a biological cause.”
COPYRIGHT 1995 Discover
COPYRIGHT 2004 Gale Group

Maternal Iron Deficiency Anemia Affects Postpartum Emotions and Cognition
John L. Beard, et. al.; J. Nutr. 135: 267–272, 2005.

ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to determine whether iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in mothers alters their maternal cognitive and behavioral performance, the mother-infant interaction, and the infant’s development. This article focuses on the relation between IDA and cognition as well as behavioral affect in the young mothers. This prospective, randomized, controlled, intervention trial was conducted in South Africa among 3 groups of mothers: nonanemic controls and anemic mothers receiving either placebo (10 g folate and 25 mg vitamin C) or daily iron (125 mg FeS04, 10 g folate, 25 mg vitamin C). Mothers of full-term normal birth weight babies were followed from 10 wk to 9 mo postpartum (n 81). Maternal hematologic and iron status, socioeconomic, cognitive, and emotional status, motherinfant interaction, and the development of the infants were assessed at 10 wk and 9 mo postpartum. Behavioral and cognitive variables at baseline did not differ between iron-deficient anemic mothers and nonanemic mothers. However, iron treatment resulted in a 25% improvement (P  0.05) in previously iron-deficient mothers’ depression and stress scales as well as in the Raven’s Progressive Matrices test. Anemic mothers administered placebo did not improve in behavioral measures. Multivariate analysis showed a strong association between iron status variables (hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, and transferrin saturation) and cognitive variables (Digit Symbol) as well as behavioral variables (anxiety, stress, depression). This study demonstrates that there is a strong relation between iron status and depression, stress, and cognitive functioning in poor African mothers during the postpartum period. There are likely ramifications of this poorer “functioning” on mother-child interactions and infant development, but the constraints around this relation will have to be defined in larger studies.

The Impact of Fatigue on the Development of Postpartum Depression
Elizabeth J. Corwin, et.al. (2005); Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, & Neonatal Nursing 34 (5) , 577–586

Background: Previous research suggests early postpartum fatigue (PPF) plays a significant role in the development of postpartum depression (PPD). Predicting risk for PPD via early identification of PPF may provide opportunity for intervention.

Objective: To replicate and extend previous studies concerning the impact of PPF on symptoms of PPD and to describe the relationships among PPF, PPD, and other variables using the theory of unpleasant symptoms.

Design: Correlational, longitudinal study.

Setting: Participants’ homes.

Participants: Convenience sample of 42 community-dwelling women recruited before 36 weeks of pregnancy.

Main Outcome Measures: PPF, depressive symptoms, and stress measured during prenatal weeks 36 to 38, and on Days 7, 14, and 28 after childbirth. Salivary cortisol was measured as a physiological marker of stress.

Results: Significant correlations were obtained between PPF and symptoms of PPD on Days 7, 14, and 28, with Day 14 PPF levels predicting future development of PPD symptoms in 10 of 11 women. Perceived stress, but not cortisol, was also correlated with symptoms of PPD on Days 7, 14, and 28. Women with a history of depression had elevated depression scores compared to women without, but no variable was as effective at predicting PPD as PPF.

Conclusions: Fatigue by Day 14 postpartum was the most predictive variable for symptoms of PPD on Day 28 in this population.

Iron supplementation for unexplained fatigue in non-anaemic women: double blind randomised placebo controlled trial
F Verdon, et. al.; BMJ 2003;326:1124 (24 May), doi:10.1136/bmj.326.7399.1124

Objective: To determine the subjective response to iron therapy in non-anaemic women with unexplained fatigue.

Design: Double blind randomised placebo controlled trial.

Setting: Academic primary care centre and eight general practices in western Switzerland.

Participants: 144 women aged 18 to 55, assigned to either oral ferrous sulphate (80 mg/day of elemental iron daily; n=75) or placebo (n=69) for four weeks.

Main outcome measures: Level of fatigue, measured by a 10 point visual analogue scale.

Results: 136 (94%) women completed the study. Most had a low serum ferritin concentration; <= 20 µg/l in 69 (51%) women. Mean age, haemoglobin concentration, serum ferritin concentration, level of fatigue, depression, and anxiety were similar in both groups at baseline. Both groups were also similar for compliance and dropout rates. The level of fatigue after one month decreased by -1.82/6.37 points (29%) in the iron group compared with -0.85/6.46 points (13%) in the placebo group (difference 0.95 points, 95% confidence interval 0.32 to 1.62; P=0.004). Subgroups analysis showed that only women with ferritin concentrations <= 50 µg/l improved with oral supplementation.

Conclusion: Non-anaemic women with unexplained fatigue may benefit from iron supplementation. The effect may be restricted to women with low or borderline serum ferritin concentrations.

Have we forgotten the significance of postpartum iron deficiency?
Lisa M. Bodnar, et. al.; American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology (2005) 193, 36–44

The postpartum period is conventionally thought to be the time of lowest iron deficiency risk because iron status is expected to improve dramatically after delivery. Nonetheless, recent studies have reported a high prevalence of postpartum iron deficiency and anemia among ethnically diverse low-income populations in the United States. In light of the recent emergence of this problem in the medical literature, we discuss updated findings on postpartum iron deficiency, including its prevalence, functional consequences, risk factors, and recommended primary and secondary prevention strategies. The productivity and cognitive gains made possible by improving iron nutriture support intervention. We therefore conclude that postpartum iron deficiency warrants greater attention and higher quality care.
2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. “

This post is not medical advice and is not a substitute for seeing your health care provider. 

Should you pre-register with the hospital??

I recently received the following question in an email from a local mom:

Hi, This is our first baby and we are a little curious if it is really neccessary to pre-register in the hospital for the birth, does it make the process faster or is it ok to just register once we arrive that day??? what do you reccommend?

Is it necessary to pre-register at the hospital before the birth? Is there any benefits?

I do highly recommend that you do pre-register before hand with your local hospital. It may not even be a bad idea to this even if you are home birthing, just in case!

Pre-registration can help the hospital to know important information ahead of time regarding you, your patient information, insurance, your emergency contact information, expected due date, your physician information, family status, and other useful information that you would want the hospital to stay updated on. This can be especially helpful in hopeful unlikely event of emergency in which you may not be able to answer these questions.

While you may still be asked questions upon your arrival, the process of pre-registering can help speed things up as well.

It only takes about 5 minutes and you can easily call, fax, mail, or go online (many hospitals now offer this online) to pre-register. Some providers offices will take care of this for you, however it never hurts to check in with your practice and find out.

Mission Hospital (which is our local hospital in Buncombe County, NC) has an OB/Preadmission you can update online

http://www.missionhospitals.org/obpreadmission

You may also call the hospital at:  828-213-1508

Lots of babies!

It’s been a busy month already. Myself and other doulas I know locally have been experiencing an increased trend of births lately. Babies and more babies being born one right after another since the Holidays. It is always an honor to share the space of birth with the families. Welcome to the world babies & Congratulations to all the families!

From WNCVegCrunchtasticMama
From WNCVegCrunchtasticMama
From WNCVegCrunchtasticMama